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12 Websites to Download Free Textures & Patterns

Google Tasks sidebar in Gmail

RightTasks for Gmail is an extension for Chrome, which adds your Google Tasks to a sidebar in Gmail.

Google Calendar has this feature by default, and allows you to have your Google Tasks visible in a sidebar, on the right side of the calendar. Since it’s so handy, people have been asking for the same feature in Gmail for, at least, as long as it’s been available in Calendar.

The default Tasks widget available in Gmail, when activated, is placed above everything else, so you have to keep opening and closing it, to not get in the way of your work.

Adds your Google Tasks to a right sidebar in Gmail, like in Google Calendar.

RightTasks places your Google Tasks in a right sidebar in Gmail, like in Google Calendar.

This is especially useful if you keep Gmail open and want to see your tasks at all times.

You can use all the features available in the official tasks widget, such as:
* “Create a task based on the open message”, which you can use from the “More > Add to Tasks” menu or with the “SHIFT + T” keyboard shortcut while viewing an email
* The “G then K” keyboard shortcut, which shifts the cursor from Gmail to Tasks.

Imitate before you create

Trends and experts exist for a reason: they work. The wheel doesn’t need reinventing, and neither does your line of work. Hundreds of thousands of freelancers have walked in your shoes and have paved a way. Walk on that path, embrace it and you’ll make your life significantly easier.
Take a look at the best in your field and steal as much as you can: develop the same habits, use the same techniques, shortcuts, setups, principles – heck, even the color shirts they wear. Fact is: success leaves clues. They aren’t hidden; you just need to look for them and integrate the findings into your own workflow

Al Sur Empanadas – Chicago Logo Development

logo-AlSur-Empanadas-4
logo-EMAPANADA-AlSur-2 logo-EMAPANADA-AlSur logo-AlSur02

CMElawsuit

Design 2

OmegaFAQ

Design 1

quarkHome quarkContact quarkFAQ

Typography Portrait

TypoPortraitDark

EC Dry Cleanning – Business Cards

Mock-ups 04-05
EC-BC-01

Business Card Mockup-4

Front Round with Hanger – 00
BusinessCard05

Front Rounded corners – 01
BusinessCard04

Front image – 02
BusinessCard03

Back Image – 03
fw-BusinessCard-back02

Folklore Soccer

FolkloreSoccerV2
FolkloreSoccer
1383716924485

1383716923915

A Cor Do Brasil

acordobrasil

Why pay for web design?

The intention of most people who decide to create a new website is to create a steady source of income for themselves. So some people may wonder why they should spend some of their budget on paying someone else to design and create their websites. The truth is that there are many reasons why having someone else design your layout is a good idea, and this article will highlight the most important ones.

By far the easiest reason to trust someone else to do the work is that they know what they are doing.

Web design companies, the good ones at least, have experienced professionals who have designed many sites beforehand. If there are small errors or glitches that need to be fixed, they will know exactly what to do. If you need a small alteration done, they will have no problem doing so. On the other hand, most website owners are not the best in the field or creating a design for their site. Remember that while it is easy to create a basic design, those types of websites are not likely to attract the traffic that is needed to make a good profit. Paying someone else to create a good, solid design that you can work with is your best bet at having a site worth keeping.
Another good aspect of working with someone else is that you are able to bounce ides off of them and get their own creative input. You probably don’t know exactly how your website should look and there is no problem with that. Even big businesses hire consultants to get different and new ideas to think about. A professional web designer probably knows specifics on what works and what doesn’t with a website and he or she can help you build the best possible website possible. Having someone to discuss ideas with will not only help you in this aspect, but it will probably also get you thinking deeper and coming up with better ideas yourself.

It is important to remember that you have to put in money before making some.

And instead of wasting time and money on classes and books and other sources towards trying to learn how to design websites yourself, you can just hire someone that is trustworthy and will do a good job.

As a website owner you have a good deal of work to do besides web design.

This includes creating content, advertising and boosting the page ranking of the site, and finding ways to get more traffic.

Letting someone else focus on the web design allows you to spend more time on the areas you can do the best in.

Speed is another reason to go with web design companies. If you were designing the site yourself, chances are that other responsibilities and a lack of knowledge would cause the project to be delayed quite some time. With people who know what they are doing and experience to boot, you can get your website designed and ready within whatever reasonable deadline you set. Remember that constant delays will end up hurting a project and making it more and more unlikely that your dream will come to fruition in the end.
Overall, there are many reasons to choose professionals when it comes to web design. While the costs of hiring these people may seem like too much right now, there is a good chance that you will end up with exactly what you envisioned and more when the designers have had their say. And all the visitors who are lucky enough to stumble upon your site will be pleased with the sleek, professional design as well!

Handcut Designs Postcard 2013

01-FRONT-ORANGEpostcardFRONT
01-BACK-BLACK4x6postcard
02-FRONT-WOOD-AWoodBG01
03-FRONT-WOOD-BWoodBG02
04-BACK-SCREWWoodBG03

Folklore Restaurant

[RFG_gallery id=’3′]

 

iiiMAGINE THAT

i3-logo-multicolor

i3-logo-multiple

Prosto One

http://www.dafont.com/prosto-one.font

prosto_one0 (1)

Multicolore

multicolore

http://www.dafont.com/multicolore.font

http://www.behance.net/gallery/Multicolore-FREE-Font/5172881

[bra_button text=’Download Ai files!’ url=’http://www.handcutdesigns.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/multicolore-by-neogrey-creative.zip’ target=’_self’ size=’large’ style=’rounded’ color=’orange’]

multicolore0 (1)

Assasins

assassin

http://www.dafont.com/assassin.font?psize=l&back=new

assassin0 (1)

Saniretro

saniretro

http://www.dafont.com/saniretro.font

saniretro0 (1)

Butch & Sundance

butch_sundance

http://www.dafont.com/butch-sundance.font?psize=l&back=new

butch_sundance5 (1)

Soft Ornaments

http://www.dafont.com/soft-ornaments-seventeen.font

soft_ornaments_seventeen0 (1)

Thinman

thinman

http://www.dafont.com/thinman.font

thinman0 (1)

Satllions

stallions

http://www.dafont.com/stallions.font?psize=l&back=new

stallions0 (1)

Grissom

Grissom Free banner

http://www.dafont.com/grissom.font

grissom0 (1)

[bra_button text=’Download’ url=’http://www.handcutdesigns.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/grissom.zip’ target=’_self’ size=’large’ style=’rounded’ color=’orange’]

Rough Fleurons

RoughFleurons FREE banners
http://www.dafont.com/rough-fleurons.font

rough_fleurons0 (1)

WoodWarrior

http://www.dafont.com/woodwarrior.font

woodwarrior

woodwarrior0 (1)

From this Moment

http://www.dafont.com/from-this-moment.font

from_this_moment0 (1)

[bra_button text=’Download’ url=’http://www.handcutdesigns.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/from_this_moment.zip’ target=’_self’ size=’large’ style=’rounded’ color=’orange’]

KG Flavor and Frames Five

http://www.dafont.com/kg-flavor-and-frames-five.font

kg_flavor_and_frames_five0 (1)

Phantom

phantom20 (1)

 

 

 

http://www.dafont.com/phantom2.font

Read more

Hoop to Help!

Hoop to Help, Illinois Premier Ballers.

Hooptohelp-logo-base-v08

Hunter & Tails

Corner

East-wall

South-wall

HT-Wood-02

HT-Wood-01

HunterLogoSheet02

Logo sampler 01

HunterLogoSheet01

Business card for Rosenbloom Advisors

Business cards for Lawyers. Set for Lewis S. Rosenbloom

 

DESIGN 2

RA-Business-Card-Mockup-Lew02

 

DESIGN 3

 

BC-v3-vijayBC-v3-lewBC-v3-back

 

10 Great Google Font Combinations You Can Copy

The average man considers which flavor of Doritos will taste good with his Heineken. The sophisticated man considers which cheese will pair well with his choice of wine. The designer of course considers which two fonts will look great on the same page.

Today we’re going to use the Google Font API as a playground for mixing fonts and finding ideal pairings. You’ll be able to skim through and instantly grab out selections that you think are appropriate for your projects. The best part? You need only to copy and paste our code to implement these fonts on your site. It’s completely free and there are no downloads required.
A couple of times each month, we re-publish one of our popular posts from the archives. This article was originally published in February, 2011, but is still just as useful today!

Why Google Fonts?

The web font game was up in the air a few years ago. Everyone had an idea and a solution but no one really knew which would be left standing when the dust settled. In my mind, this debate is over: @font-face won.

Here’s why @font-face wins. First, a pure CSS solution is one that developers can get on board with. Next, the fact that @font-face fully supports text selection and actions such as copy and paste means that usability experts love it. Finally, the fact that you can easily cook up an @font-face recipe for just about any font means that designers love it because they have a wide range of properly licensed fonts to choose from. If you get developers, designers and the usability guys on board, it’s game over for Flash, JavaScript and image-based solution.

Now, within the @font-face world there are many competitors. My personal favorite solution is just to useFontSquirrel’s @font-face kits, whether I’m downloading one of their pre-built options or uploading a font file so the site can churn out the rest for me.

However, I’ve used this solution several times on Design Shack before so I wanted to switch things up today and use something else. Since the Google Font Directory is free and has plenty of options, it seemed like a natural fit!

screenshot

Quick Tips for Combining Fonts

Before we get started, there are a few basic rules that you can keep in mind when combining fonts. These aren’t absolutes that you must follow in every occasion but merely some guidelines to stick to when in doubt.

Use Font Families

First of all, when possible, check out the various fonts within a single family. These fonts have meticulously been designed to work together and are therefore the safest method of varying your font without creating visual discord.

Contrast is King

Next, when you’re combining two fonts, go for contrast. Try pairing a bold slab with a light sans-serif. If you mix two fonts that are fairly similar, the lack of contrast makes it look more like something is slightly off with the typography rather than the intended impression of two different typefaces. Make it clear to designers and non-designers alike that two distinct styles are present.

Go Easy

Also, limit yourself to only a few typefaces. If you can get by with two, do it, if not, stop at three. In all but the most experienced hands, lots of different fonts wreak havoc on the cohesiveness of a design. It’s easy to end up looking like a kid who just discovered the font menu in Photoshop for the first time.

Think About Which Fonts Are Appropriate

Finally, let the content play a big role in your font choice. If your content is modern and professional, stick to fonts that suggest these qualities. If it’s supposed to look like something from the 1700s, Helvetica Neue Ultra Light might not be the best way to go.

The Fonts!

Enough discussion already, let’s get down to business. Cruise over to the Google Font Directory and look for the following options.

If you’ve never worked with the Google Font Directory before, don’t worry, it’s the easiest custom font solution out there. All you have to do is drop a link into your page header and then reference the font in your CSS font-family just like you would anything else. For each font pairing below I’ll provide you with all the necessary snippets of code so that all you have to do is copy and paste!

Lobster & Cabin

Lobster is one of my favorite scripts of all time. It’s bold and beautiful while remaining quite readable, attributes not easily found in other scripts.

To complement this strong statement, you don’t want anything that competes for attention. Instead pick something plain and simple like Cabin.

screenshot

The HTML

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<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lobster" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">
<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Cabin" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">

 

The CSS

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h1 {
    font-family: 'Lobster', Georgia, Times, serif;
    font-size: 70px;
    line-height: 100px;
}
p {
    font-family: 'Cabin', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
    font-size: 15px;
    line-height: 25px;
}

 

Raleway & Goudy Bookletter 1911

screenshot

Raleway is a super attractive font, but it’s so thin that it doesn’t always work the best on body copy. For this reason, it’s best to keep it as large as possible whenever you can, which makes it a perfect font for your headers.

I think the combination of Raleway and the fairly ornate old stye Goudy Bookletter 1911 make for a super classy pair. Be careful though, this particular Goudy is a little too complex for tons of body copy and I definitely wouldn’t want to read a big page full of copy written in it. This combination is probably best for scenarios with minimal copy.

The HTML

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<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Goudy+Bookletter+1911" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">
<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Raleway:100" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">

 

The CSS

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h1 {
    font-family: 'Raleway', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
    font-size: 50px;
    line-height: 70px;
}
p {
    font-family: 'Goudy Bookletter 1911', Georgia, Times, serif;
    font-size: 15px;
    line-height: 25px;
}

 

Allerta & Crimson Text

screenshot

Allerta is a moderately bold sans-serif with a personality. If you don’t want something boring or something crazy, it’s a good middle ground that looks great in both a headline and body copy.

Crimson Text is a straightforward font with strong serifs but little to no differentiation between the thicks and thins. This makes is retain a good amount of readability even when its small.

The HTML

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<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Crimson+Text" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">
<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Allerta" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">

 

The CSS

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h1 {
    font-family: 'Allerta', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
    font-size: 50px;
    line-height: 55px;
}
p {
    font-family: 'Crimson Text', Georgia, Times, serif;
    font-size: 16px;
    line-height: 25px;
}

 

Arvo & PT Sans

screenshot

No font selection would be complete without a good slab serif. The Google Font Directory only has a couple of these and Arvo is currently one of the boldest options. I really like most of the characters but admit that the “S” feels a little awkward.

I paired this with yet another great sans-serif: PT Sans. There are several variants of this available but the plain version is the best for body copy. I really like how round the characters are, it makes for a very friendly feel.

The HTML

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<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Arvo" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">
<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=PT+Sans" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">

 

The CSS

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h1 {
    font-family: 'Arvo', Georgia, Times, serif;
    font-size: 59px;
    line-height: 70px;
}
p {
    font-family: 'PT Sans', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
    font-size: 16px;
    line-height: 25px;
}

 

Dancing Script & Josefin Sans

screenshot

Scripts are hard to implement properly, especially when they’re not as widely applicable as Lobster. Dancing Script, shown in the example above, definitely isn’t my favorite script but it’s one of the better ones available in the Google Font Directory.

Since Dancing Script is a lot more feminine than Lobster, I paired it with Joesfin, a really thin sans-serif to further this style. This combination is definitely appropriate for any products or websites with a female skew.

The HTML

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<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Dancing+Script" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">
<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Josefin+Sans" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">

 

The CSS

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h1 {
    font-family: 'Dancing Script', Georgia, Times, serif;
    font-size: 59px;
    line-height: 60px;
}
p {
    font-family: 'Josefin Sans', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
    font-size: 18px;
    line-height: 25px;
    margin-top: 15px;
}

 

Allan & Cardo

screenshot

I typically hate comic-type fonts, but Allan is really eye-catching and attractive. I love the boldness of the font and the italicized feel.

My pairing with an old style font (Cardo) seems almost a conflict of time periods but I really liked the way they looked together. Feel free to opt instead for a light sans-serif.

The HTML

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<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Allan:bold" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">
<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Cardo" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">

 

The CSS

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h1 {
    font-family: 'Allan', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
    font-size: 70px;
    line-height: 75px;
}
p {
    font-family: 'Cardo', Georgia, Times, serif;
    font-size: 18px;
    line-height: 25px;
}

 

Molengo & Lekton

screenshot

Molengo and Lekton together feel like an old school attempt at a technical feel. Largely due to the typewriter feel of the latter of these.

This combination is something I would expect to see on a website with a parchment texture background along with photos with a polaroid effect and maybe even some coffee stains.

The HTML

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<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lekton" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">
<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Molengo" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">

 

The CSS

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h1 {
    font-family: 'Molengo', Georgia, Times, serif;
    font-size: 56px;
    line-height: 80px;
}
p {
    font-family: 'Lekton', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
    font-size: 16px;
    line-height: 25px;
}

 

Droid Serif & Droid Sans

screenshot

One of our tips above suggested staying within a single family. I put this into practice here with the natural combination of Droid Serif and Droid Sans.

As you can see, both are beautiful typefaces that perfectly complement each other. These could easily be switched so that Droid Serif was the body font and Droid Sans the header font. You can spot Droid in the wild on a certain wildly popular design blog.

The HTML

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<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Droid+Serif" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">
<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Droid+Sans" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">

 

The CSS

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h1 {
    font-family: 'Droid Serif', Georgia, Times, serif;
    font-size: 49px;
    line-height: 65px;
}
p {
    font-family: 'Droid Sans', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
    font-size: 14px;
    line-height: 25px;
}

 

Corbin & Nobile

screenshot

If you’re a fan of Cooper Black, Corbin is an excellent free alternative. This fat and toony serif is perfect for anything that should have a 1920s feel to it.

Nobile is a more modern font with letter forms that appear vertically stretched. The minimal styling here keeps your focus on the bold headlines.

The HTML

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<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Corben:bold" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">
<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Nobile" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">

 

The CSS

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h1 {
    font-family: 'Corben', Georgia, Times, serif;
    font-size: 40px;
    line-height: 55px;
}
p {
    font-family: 'Nobile', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
    font-size: 13px;
    line-height: 25px;
}

 

Ubuntu & Vollkorn

screenshot

Ubuntu is a notably rounded sans that has a modern feel to it. I used the bold variant here to give extra contrast from the body text.

Vollkorn is definitely a very different typeface, mirroring a long past era. Again, always be careful about mixing fonts from different time periods. Make sure it’s intentional and with purpose!

The HTML

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<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Ubuntu:bold" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">
<link href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Vollkorn" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">

 

The CSS

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h1 {
    font-family: 'Ubuntu', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
    font-size: 50px;
    line-height: 65px;
}
p {
    font-family: 'Vollkorn', Georgia, Times, serif;
    font-size: 16px;
    line-height: 25px;
}

 

GGU Law – New logo porposal

GGU-Header01

 

NEWlogos2 NEWlogos3

Rosenbloom

Comp02 Comp02 Comp01 Comp01

How to Add Google Web Fonts in WordPress Themes the “Right” way

Google Web fonts are amazing free resource for web designers. In WPBv4, we have started using a popular Google Font combination: Oswald and Lora. Some of our users have asked us how to add Google Web fonts in WordPress themes. If you remember, we showed how to add Google fonts in WordPress Post Editor. In this article, we will show you how to add Google Web Fonts in your WordPress themes the RIGHT way, optimized for performance.

Find the Google Web Fonts that You Like

First thing you need to do is find a Google font that you like. Head on over toGoogle fonts library and browse through the fonts. When you find the font that you like, click on the “Quick-use” button.

Google Fonts Quick-use Button

Once you click the quick-use button, you will be taken to a new page. Scroll down till you see the box: Add this code to your website.

Add Google Fonts to WordPress Code

Copy that code and paste it in a notepad for future use. We are seeing that most folks use at least two google fonts (heading + text combo). Like we did with Oswald + Lora. So repeat this process for the second font.

Adding Google Web Fonts in WordPress Themes

As you can see that Google provides 3 possible ways of adding Google web fonts to your website. There is the “Standard” way, “@import” way, and the “Javascript” way. We have mostly seen folks using the first two methods.

The easiest way would be to open your theme’s style.css file and paste the fonts code that you got in step one like so:

We have seen a lot of folks doing this. StudioPress developers are doing it this way in their Genesis child themes because its simple. However, this is NOT the right way of doing it. Using @import method blocks parallel downloads, meaning that the browser will wait for the imported file to finish downloading before it starts downloading the rest of the content. So while it may seem convenient, it is not the BEST way if you care about your site’s speed and page load time. You can see more details about it here.

The next best thing you can do is merge multiple Google Fonts requests into one to avoid additional HTTP queries. Here is how you would do it:

If you MUST use @import, then at least combine multiple requests into one.

Performance Optimized Method of Adding Google Web Fonts

The best way of doing this is by using the Standard method which utilizes the link method instead of the import method. Simply take your two URLs that you got from step 1. Combine the two fonts with a | character. Then place the code in your theme’s head section. You will most likely have to edit your header.php file, and paste the following code above your main stylesheet. The example would look like this:

1 <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css"href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lora|Oswald"media="screen">
2 <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="YOUR THEME STYLESHEET" media="screen">

Basically the goal is to put the font request as early as possible. According to theGoogle Web Fonts blog, if there is a script tag before the @font-face declaration, then Internet Explorer won’t render anything on the page until the font file is done downloading.

Once you have done that, you can simply start using it in your theme’s CSS file like this:

1 h1 {
2     font-family'Oswald'HelveticaArialserif;
3 }

Now there are a lot of theme frameworks and child themes out there. It is NOT recommended to modify your parent theme’s files specially if you are using a theme framework because your changes will be overridden the next time you update that framework. You will need to utilize the hooks and filters presented to you by that parent theme or framework to add Google fonts properly in your child themes.

As you can see by looking at our Blueprint page, that WPBv4 is a custom child theme of the Genesis framework. So we will show you how to add Google Web fonts in your Genesis powered theme.

How to Add Google Web Fonts in Genesis Child Themes

Open your child theme’s functions.php file and paste the following code:

1 add_action( 'genesis_meta''wpb_add_google_fonts', 5);
2
3 function wpb_add_google_fonts() {
4         echo '<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lora|Oswald" media="screen">';
5 }

Don’t forget to replace the font link with your own.

Basically what we are doing is hooking into genesis_meta hook which excutes in the section of the document source. By default things like META description, keywords, stylesheet and favicons are output here. By us setting the priority to 5, we ensure that this stylesheet will be loaded before the main stylesheet.

Sorry we cannot cover all existing parent themes and frameworks that exist. If you have a question regarding your specific theme, then please ask those in the appropriate forums to those theme developers.

Our last tip on using Google Web Fonts on your site would be to don’t ask for fonts you won’t use. For example, if you only want the bold, and normal weight, then don’t add all the other styles.

We hope that this article helps you add Google Web Fonts in your WordPress themes the right way, so your site can load fast.

 

Original Article here: http://www.wpbeginner.com/wp-themes/how-add-google-web-fonts-wordpress-themes/

How To Write An Effective Design Brief

brief_PhotoIf you answer these questions below in an ordered and detailed fashion, your design brief will be 90% done… the other 10% will come from further questions from the designer after you submit your brief.

Have fun answering the questions and remember, provide as much detail as possible! This does not mean one line answers.

What does your business do?

Tip: Never assume that the designer will know anything about your company. Be clear and  concise  and avoid jargon when replying.

  • What does your company / organisation do?
  • What is your company’s history?

What are the goals?  Why?

  • What is the overall goal of the new design project?
  • What are you trying to communicate and why?
  • Are you trying to sell more products or get awareness of your product / service?
  • How do you differ from your competitors?
  • Do you want to completely reinvent yourself or are you simply updating your promotional material?
Tip:  You should also provide old promotional material to assist the designer.

Who is the target market?

 

  • What are your target market’s demographics & phychographics? ie. the age, gender, income, tastes, views, attitudes, employment, geography, lifestyle of those you want to reach.

Tip: If you have multiple audiences, rank them in terms of importance.

What copy (text) and pictures are needed?

Tip: The copy and pictures used in a design are as crucial as the design itself and you should clearly state who is going to be providing the copy and pictures if needed.  You may need to look into getting a professional copywriter / photographer – ask your designer for some recommendations.

  • What copy needs to be included in the design? Who is providing the copy?
  • What pictures / photographs / diagrams etc need to be used? Who is providing these?

What are the specifications?

  • What size is the design going to be?
  • Where is it going to be printed / used? The web, business cards, stationery, on your car?
  • What other information should the designer know in regards to specifications?

Have you got a benchmark in mind?

  • You should provide the designer with some examples of what you consider to be effective or relevant design even if it is from your main competitors. This will set a benchmark for your designer.
  • Provide the designer with things not to do, and styles that you do not like or wish to see in your design. This will give the designer an idea of what to avoid and will avoid disappointment on your behalf.

What Is Your Budget?

  • Providing a budget prevents designers wasting valuable time and  resources when trying to maximise your budget.
  • Providing the budget upfront also allows designers to know if the project is going to be worthwhile to complete. Make sure you are worth their time.

What is the time scale / deadline?

  • Give the designer a detailed schedule of the project and set a realistic deadline for the completion of the work. You should take into account the various stages of the design project such as consultation, concept development, production and delivery.

Tip: Rushing design jobs helps no one and mistakes can be made if a complex job is pushed through without time to review, however, there are times when a rush job is needed, and in these cases you should be honest and upfront about it.

Five Reasons Why Freelancers Should Have A Contract For Every Job

Five Reasons Why Freelancers Should Have A Contract For Every Job

  1. A contract can help to assure that both you and the client agree on the terms of the project and the nature of the work.
  2. A contract clearly spells out payment terms, due date, number of revisions, and the answers to numerous other questions that might arise during the course of the project.
  3. A contract may provide legal protection for both the client and the freelancer.
  4. A contract clearly conveys that you are a professional running a business and that you are serious about your work.
  5. A contract protects the freelancer from changes in the scope of work and the client from work that doesn’t meet the contractual requirements.

Five Reasons Why Freelancers Don’t Need A Contract For Every Job

  1. Some jobs are too small for a contract to be practical. Writing a specific contract for the job could take longer than takes to do the work and cost more than the project is worth.
  2. Business is based on trust. A client who violates the terms of an informal agreement will probably also violate the terms of a contract.
  3. Requiring a contract for every freelance project may cause you to lose some clients who don’t want to go to the trouble of signing a formal agreement.
  4. Waiting for a contract to be finalized can delay the start of a project.
  5. Some freelancers don’t have the expertise or knowledge to create their own contract and don’t want to pay the price for a contract drawn up by an attorney.

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